tim: Tim with short hair, smiling, wearing a black jacket over a white T-shirt (Default)
Long overdue, here are my notes on the talks at CUFP 2014 (September 6, 2014). This is the last in a series of conference write-up posts from me that cover CUFP, the Haskell Symposium, Erlang Workshop, and the three days of ICFP itself. CUFP is the workshop for Commercial Users of Functional Programming, and I was honored to have served on the program committee for it this year.

Joe Armstrong's invited talk, "Making Money with FP", was quite entertaining... for the most part anyway. His comment that you can't sell a language, and must sell a project written in it, harked back for me to working at Laszlo Systems in 2005.

He made the point, about adoption of FP, that "nobody ever got sacked for using Microsoft products (or Java, or C++" -- also this gem, "You get paid based on the number of people you manage, so people hate the idea that ten Haskell programmers can do what 100 C++ programmers can do." (I'm not confident that that generalization always holds, but it does seem to be true in my experience.)

One aside that marred an otherwise great talk was an unnecessary use of "guys" on a slide, when Armstrong said (while speaking to the same slide) "technical guys enjoy an argument". One or the other and I might have let it slide, but not all "technical guys" enjoy an argument, plus technical women who enjoy arguments are punished for that while technical women who don't enjoy arguments tend to get steamrolled.

Then, Armstrong went on to talk about different business models for making money from FP. Most of this advice seemed broadly applicable, but it was still good to hear it coming from one of the people who is most qualified to talk about "how to make money with FP". He implied, I think, that the best two routes for a person trying to get into business with FP were either a consultancy (where you are an independent businessperson who sells consulting hours or services to other companies) or a development/R&D company where the goal is to "develop a product and sell it to a bigger company that can sell it." He explained how a good way to gain a reputation is to participate in the standardization of a language or framework: either choose a new standard or invent one of your own, and then make the best and first implementation. Then, you sell or give away software to build your reputation (which is why you can't sell a language, I guess!) and finally, sell the company :D
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tim: Tim with short hair, smiling, wearing a black jacket over a white T-shirt (Default)
Previous notes: ICFP, days 1, 2, 3.

These notes are about Friday, September 5. Thursday, I missed the whole day of conferencing and only went to the industrial reception in the evening. I hadn't planned to go to many talks on Thursday anyway, but I ended up spending Wednesday night (all of it) in the ER at Ă–stra Sjukhuset, since I didn't know how else to get a relatively minor thing requiring antibiotics treated at night. (Since I didn't get seen till 5 AM, I should have just waited till the next morning!) So that meant sleeping till about 3 on Thursday.

On Friday, I'd been planning to mostly go to the Erlang Workshop and drop in on a Haskell Symposium talk or two, but I ended up doing the opposite, oops. Somehow, I always end up going to the "Future of Haskell" discussion, even in years when I'm not doing Haskell. I already talked about the discussion a little bit in my Ada Initiative fundraiser post; what Wouter said about being encouraging to newcomers was part of it. During the discussion part, somebody stood up and said "well, as far as I'm concerned, everything's fine because the Haskell community has been friendly to me and I've had a good experience." I'm probably being a bit unfair to him, but certainly the implication was that his good experience was a sign there was no problem, even if he didn't say so explicitly. I stood up and pointed out that the people we need to listen to are the ones who aren't in the room -- presumably, everyone who was attending the Haskell Symposium was there because they had a good experience with the community. I don't think I exactly said so, but further compounding things is that some of the specific people who have been particularly hostile to novices were in the room. If you have no idea what I'm talking about at this point, Gershom's "Letter to a Young Haskell Enthusiast" should be a good start. I'm motivated here by having friends who wanted to learn Haskell but gave up because people were hostile to them, and I hate that the response to that is for people to say their experiences were good -- that doesn't give me anything to tell my friends.

I also touched on this in my fundraiser post, but the fact that on day 2 of the Haskell Symposium, there were maybe 100 people in the room and (as far as I could tell) none of them were women, by itself, indicates that there's a problem. Arguments that women just aren't interested in Haskell, or aren't good at it, or prefer to do real-world things where they get to help people (unlike teaching and research, I guess?) have so little merit that they're not worth discussing. I know that the lack of women in the room was for a reason, which is that largely, women aren't finding the Haskell community -- or the functional programming community, or communities around programming language theory and practice more broadly -- welcoming. The fact that there are a few exceptions means that a few women who have an exceptional level of interest, talent, and (for some, anyway) privileges along axes other than gender have been able to make it. They should be listened to for the same reason that someone who runs marathons while wearing a 100-pound backpack knows more about running marathons than someone who runs marathons unladen. But it's not enough for a few exceptional women to be allowed in -- to paraphrase Bella Abzug, equality doesn't mean access only for the exceptional women, but for mediocre women to do as well as mediocre men.

Wouter made a comment about "encouraging women", and while we should, I wish people would spend less time saying "encourage women", and more time saying "don't be a jerk". Of course, neither imperative means much without further detail. As Gershom's letter reflects (indirectly), when I say that the community is unwelcoming to women, it's often not about overt sexism (though there is some of that), but rather, a very popular aggressive, adversarial, confrontational teaching style that many people apply to a broad range of interactions besides those that are understood as teaching situations. And it's not that women don't like to be or don't want to be aggressive -- it's that they know from lived experience that being aggressive and adversarial with men has consequences, and not good ones. This is the double bind: there is a very narrow range of allowable behavior for women in any grossly male-dominated subculture, and a very wide range for men. So besides just "encouraging women", men also need to approach intellectual conversations in ways that aren't about showing dominance... even when they're only talking to each other.

Here's the video of the entire discussion, which I think includes all the audience comments.

After lunch, I went to some of the Erlang Workshop talks. The first one was Amir Ghaffari on "Investigating the Scalability of Distributed Erlang". The talk didn't spend much time introducing Distributed Erlang itself, but rather, focused on running DE-Bench (the benchmark suite for it) on different number of nodes to see how well Distributed Erlang scales. DE-Bench lets you run tests synchronously or asynchronously, on one or all nodes. Ghaffari found that throughput drops off dramatically if you start using global operations (which, intuitively, isn't surprising). He also found that latency for global commands grows linearly in the number of nodes -- I wasn't so sure why that was true. He found that Riak didn't scale past 70 nodes at all -- at that point, an overloaded server process became the bottleneck. He concluded that everything about Distributed Erlang scales well except for RPC; not being familiar with Distributed Erlang, I'm not sure how much of a problem that is.

In the next talk in the same session, Chris Meiklejohn spoke on dataflow-deterministic distributed dataflow programming for Erlang. The talk was about using Erlang to build a reference implementation for CRDTs, as well as building a new language (that is, a subset of Erlang) for CRDTs. It was cool that Meiklejohn was implementing some ideas from Lindsey's work, both because I know Lindsey and because it was something I'd heard about before, so I had at least a moment where I got to feel smart ;)

Meiklejohn and colleagues' system, DerFlow, is state-based; CRDTs require something to grow monotonically, and in this case, it's state. Meiklejohn pointed out that for distributed systems, this is great, because unreliable networks mean that packets could get dropped, but never cause already-transmitted data to be forgotten. Proving correctness means proving properties over the lattice of choices; a choice is a particular sequence of messages received by a program. Their memory model is a single-assignment store: any given memory location goes from null (no binding), to variable (which means it's "partially bound"), to value (bound). If one node asks for something unbound, it will wait until it becomes bound -- so, deadlock can happen. I'm handwaving a bit in my explanation here, but fortunately, you can go look at the code yourself on Github!

Finally, I went to one last Haskell Symposium talk that I wouldn't have gone to if Ed Kmett hadn't recommended it, and indeed, it was worth going to: Atze van der Ploeg's "Reflection Without Remorse". The talk was cool, but at this point my brain was pretty fried and I bet the paper will be even cooler. van der Ploeg motivated the problem by talking about how a chain of list append operations gets evaluated depending on associativity -- depending on where you parenthesize, one way is a lot more expensive than the other. I think this is the same problem as the infamous foldr/foldl problem. The solution (that makes the cost of evaluation the same regardless of associativity) is to rewrite expressions in CPS form -- this looks to me a lot like the build operation from shortcut deforestation. If I'm not totally lost, I think during this talk, I finally understood why build is called build for the first time (and I did my undergrad and master's theses on shortcut deforestation) -- the build form represents building up a list as a continuation. Then you run into a problem with having to convert between list repreesntations and function representations and vice versa -- I think I actually ran into something similar in my master's thesis work that I didn't quite know how to handle, so if I'm in a mood for revisiting some ancient history, maybe I'll try to figure out if there's really a connection there or not.

So far, apparently, Okasaki already solved the problem -- just for lists -- in Purely Functional Data Structures. But you can actually generalize the problem to all monads, not just lists! That's where it gets really cool. The continuation monad transformer for monads (which I don't understand) is apparently another instance of the same problem. My mind started melting a little at this point, but the upshot is that you can do monadic reflection, where you have interchangeable continuation-based and concrete forms of a data structure and can alternate between building and reflection.

That's all for Friday -- stay tuned for my final ICFP-ish post, in which I'll summarize the CUFP talks.
tim: Tim with short hair, smiling, wearing a black jacket over a white T-shirt (Default)
In my initial challenge post, I left the connection between functional programming and the Ada Initiative's mission a bit unclear. I suspected that most people who would already be inclined to listen would already understand what TAI has to do with helping bring more people into functional programming and use their talents fruitfully there.

But on the Haskell subreddit, where a Redditor by the name of LeCoqUser (in reference to the Coq proof assistant, of course) linked to my initial post, one person wrote: "I cannot fathom what this has to do with Haskell or functional programming..." I'm going to give this person the benefit of the doubt and assume they really meant, "What does this have to do with Haskell or functional programming?", and were simply applying a principle that many people like me -- who were socialized by Usenet -- learned: "If you want to know the answer to something, never just ask a question; make a false statement that's designed to get people to answer your real question by correcting you."

And it worked! Here's what I wrote on Reddit. My comment was specific to Haskell because it was on the Haskell subreddit (it's also the community I know the best), but I think what follows applies to all other functional programming language communities too.

Just to clarify why it's on-topic, I'd like to say a little bit more about what the Ada Initiative (TAI) does and how it helps the Haskell community:

  • As has been noted, TAI helps conferences and meetups develop codes of conduct. The ACM anti-harassment policy, which applies to ICFP and other conferences and workshops related to Haskell, is based on TAI's model code of conduct.
  • TAI leads anti-impostor-syndrome workshops for women who want to enter technology. As I tried to explain in my blog post, impostor syndrome is a structural barrier to getting involved in functional programming for many people who otherwise would be interested. Impostor syndrome disproportionally affects women. By helping fight impostor syndrome, one woman at a time, TAI is creating more potential members of the Haskell community.
  • TAI runs AdaCamp, which has a potentially life-changing effect as self-reported by many of the women who have participated -- in terms of building the confidence necessary to participate in tech as a career software developer and/or open-source volunteer. Again, this means more potential Haskell programmers -- there's no sense in losing half the potential audience before they even start.
  • TAI runs Ally Skills workshops, which help men who want to make their tech communities safer for women -- including, I like to think, most of the men reading this -- put their intent into action.

Hopefully that clarifies things, and I hope folks from Reddit will help us reach our new goal of $8192 $10,000! Money talks, and the fact that we've already raised $4320 [edit: $5557] [edit: $8678] from functional programmers in less than a day [edit: two days] [edit: three days] says to me that most of us recognize that TAI's work is both crucial, and not being done by any comparable organization.

Donation button

Donate to the Ada Initiative

Don't forget to tweet to #lambda4ada when you donate! Suggested tweet, though you're encouraged to use your own words:

I donated to @adainitiative b/c I want @TheOfficialACM events to announce their anti-harassment policy. https://supportada.org?campaign=lambda #lambda4ada

tim: "System Status: Degraded" (degraded)
It's usually a good thing when people talk about ways to increase women's participation in programming communities. I used to be active in the Haskell community, so normally, that the subject came up during the annual "Future of Haskell" discussion at this year's Haskell Symposium would be something for me to cheer about.

Sometimes, men talk about the gender disparity in tech communities as if there's some big mystery. I have to conclude that these guys haven't talked to women who currently work in computer science academia and the tech industry, or who did and then left. As someone who was perceived as a girl or woman doing computer science for 12 years, my solution to the lack of women in tech is:

Stop telling women that they aren't welcome and don't belong.



During the "Future of Haskell" discussion, Doaitse Swierstra (a professor of computer science at the University of Utrecht), suggested that a good way to increase the number of Haskell programmers would be to recruit one woman for every man in the room and that this would be a good thing because it would "make the meetings more attractive".

In other words: he followed a call for more participation by women with exactly the kind of comment that tells women that a space is unsafe for them.

Suggesting that more women would be welcomed at a conference because they would make it "more attractive" is saying that women are valued for how they look, not for what they do. If you've ever heard the words "objectification" or "hypersexualization" and not known what they meant, well, look no further than this comment for an example. And because many women see spaces where they are targets for the male gaze as spaces where they will be targets for more than just men's gazes, it's a comment that carries the underlying message that the computer science conference under discussion is not, in fact, a place where a self-protecting woman ought to be. It's not that Prof. Swierstra said any of this outright, of course. He didn't have to. English-speaking academicians are part of that subset of the world in which everyone comes pre-installed with the cultural programming that means a few words about the "attractiveness" that more women participants would bring to the Haskell Symposium evoke a whole world of stereotypes -- ones that limit women's choices, careers, and lives.

Swierstra's remarks were also potentially alienating to any non-heterosexual men who were present, as they reflected an assumption that he was speaking to an audience of people who found women, and only women, "attractive". Finally, there is a tacit understanding when one talks about "attractive" women that one is talking about women who have cissexual bodies, are thin, aren't disabled, and are in a particular, narrow age range. So apparently, if you're a woman and not all of those descriptors apply to you, maybe you shouldn't think about learning Haskell, as your presence wouldn't make the Haskell Symposium more attractive (to heterosexual men).

So while Prof. Swierstra may have meant no harm -- may indeed have meant to do good by encouraging efforts to increase women's participation in the Haskell community -- what matters is not his intent, but the effect of his words. (Everyone who's ever written code knows that the compiler doesn't care about your intent; extend that to your interactions with other people, and you might find yourself behaving more fairly.) Any women who were in the room for the meeting (and when I have attended it in the past, there have always been at least a few) got the message that if they weren't there to be pretty, why were they there? And any women who watched the video of the discussion (relevant part begins around 32 minutes in) got the message that the Haskell community is a community that tolerates sexism.

When I watched the video, what I heard after Prof. Swierstra's comment about attractiveness was laughter. No one called him out; the discussion moved on. I might be wrong here, but the laughter didn't sound like the nervous laughter of people who have recognized that they've just heard something terrible, but don't know quite what to do about it, either (though I'm sure that was the reaction of some attendees). It sounded like the laughter of people who were amused by something funny.

It would have taken just one person to stand up at that moment and say, "That was sexist and it's not acceptable here." (That person would probably have to be a senior faculty member or researcher, someone of equal rank to Prof. Swierstra; challenging a male, senior researcher is not something a female grad student (or even maybe a male grad student) should be expected to do.) But nobody did. And that's what really disappoints me. Structural sexism persists not because of the few people who do and say blatantly bad things, but because of the majority who tolerate them. People say things like the things Prof. Swierstra said because they are socially rewarded for it: they can get a few laughs. Also, they can display their membership in a high-status group (heterosexual men). Take the reward away, and the comments and actions that exclude go away too.

I expected more from the people who attend the Haskell Symposium. I expected more because for years, I attended ICFP and the Haskell Symposium, and even in the days when I didn't identify as male and didn't usually challenge others' perception of me as a woman, I felt like I was in a community where I belonged when I was there. For the most part, I didn't feel like my perceived gender was called attention to, and I felt like I would be judged based on what I could contribute to a conversation rather than on whether a man would find my appearance pleasing. If my first Haskell Symposium as a twenty-year-old had been in 2012 instead of 2000, I wouldn't have come away with the same impression. And I don't know if I would have gone back.

I'm no longer in the community of people who attend ICFP, and I no longer work on Haskell projects. My academic career ended a year ago when I was told that I couldn't be a grad student if I didn't want to interact with another student I'd witnessed joking about raping a fellow student. I have a job that doesn't involve Haskell, and lack the privilege of having spare time and energy left to do programming projects when I'm done with paying work. There have been days when I've had regrets. Today is not one of them. If I'd continued doing functional programming research, I could have been an agent for change; sexism no longer affects me directly now that folks have to have it spelled out for them that I'm not a cis man. Still, I don't feel like a community that makes somebody feel like it's acceptable to say that women would add "attractiveness" to a professional meeting is a community that I belong in.

If you are a man in this community, please don't feel like you have no power. You actually have a lot of power: you can let people who make these comments know that sexism isn't okay. The Geek Feminism Wiki's "Resources for allies" page is one resource that can help; the wiki also has a page of good sexism comebacks. Some comebacks that might have helped in this situation are: "I don't think that sounds as funny as you want it to sound"; "Who let you think it would be okay to say something like that?"; "Excuse me? / "I'm sorry, I don't quite understand what you're trying to say. Could you state it more plainly?"; "It sounds like you are implying <sexist thing>. I'm sure you don't really think that. <change subject>"; "That was sexist"; and (if used by the moderator) "We're done" and "That was sexist, and that is not acceptable here." Of course, there are others. The most important thing you can do to be an ally is to listen to women, and people who are perceived as women, in your community. Don't lecture people about how to respond to difficulties you haven't faced; simply learn from their own self-reporting of their experiences. Of course, don't demand that others educate you without establishing trust, either.

Countering sexism requires courage and (in Samuel Delany's words) moral stamina. It is work that largely needs to be done by men, since men who tacitly believe that women aren't quite human are hardly going to listen to women's opinions on the subject. For men to do this work, of course, they have to believe that women belong in their communities, that women are more than just attractive bodies, and that their communities will benefit from the inclusion of women -- benefit in ways that are not about aesthetics. Whether from within or without, I hope that the Haskell community will include more men who have this courage and who believe these principles -- whether or not the presence of those men makes the community more attractive.


Addendum: If you're coming here from Reddit, please take the time to read four background pieces that are part of my earlier series of essays "A Problem With Equality": "Power and privilege", "Systems and individuals", "What oppression is", and "Emotional invalidation". Most criticisms of the piece you're reading have already been answered in one of these essays.
tim: Tim with short hair, smiling, wearing a black jacket over a white T-shirt (Default)
How much did this reddit comment potentially cost you, user valhalla_coder? I suspect you have absolutely no idea.
tim: Tim with short hair, smiling, wearing a black jacket over a white T-shirt (Default)
Since Facebook is made out of monkeys smoking crack and won't let me post this image, here's where I went biking today:

Definitely better than where I went biking on Friday:

And finally, I'd like to say that LA is a strange place, but this picture was actually in Glendale:

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tim: Tim with short hair, smiling, wearing a black jacket over a white T-shirt (Default)
Tim Chevalier

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